Latin Synonyms Thelephora muscigena Stereum boreale Leptoglossum laeve
Lachnella muscigena Cyphellostereum laeve
Cyphella laevis is a rare mushroom that grows mainly on forest soils and on woods. Its main season begins in July and ends in October.
Icon

Practical Data

Sensory, Occurrence, Shape, and Coloring of Cyphella laevis

Icon
Sensory
Icon
Edibility
Poorly Edible
Icon
Taste
Mild
Icon
Occurrence
Icon
Rarity
Rare
Icon
Season
July - October
Icon
Growth
Forest Soils Woods
Icon
Shape
Icon
Group
Gill Mushroom
Icon
Size
1 to 1 cm
Icon
Cap
Funnel-Like
Icon
Stem
Fibrous
Icon
Stem Surface
Flaky
Icon
Spore Donor
Adnate Decurrent Gills Bifurcate
Icon
Coloring
Icon
Cap
White Yellow
Icon
Flesh
White
Icon
Gills
White
Icon
Spore Dust
White
icon

Research Data

Etymology and Classification of Cyphella laevis

Icon

Etymology

Scientific name Cyphella laevis
Gender Feminine
Status of name Legitimate
Type of name Combination
Rank Species
Year of publication 1953
Authors S. Lundell & J.A. Nannfeldt
Icon

Classification

  • Fungi
  • Dikarya
  • Basidiomycota
  • Agaricomycotina
  • Agaricomycetes
  • Agaricomycetidae
  • Agaricales
  • Cyphellaceae
  • Cyphella
Icon

Description

Description of Cyphella laevis

Occurrence and Growth

Cyphella laevis is a rare mushroom that grows mainly on forest soils and on woods. Its main season begins in July and ends in October.

Icon

Forest soils

Icon

Woods

Edibility, Taste and Smell

Cyphella laevis is poorly edible. The mushroom tastes mild.

Icon

Poorly edible

Icon

Mild taste

Shape and Surface

Cyphella laevis commonly measures from 1 to 1 cm. The cap is shaped funnel-like. The stem is fibrous. The stem surface is flaky. The spore donor can be described as adnate, decurrent, and gills bifurcate.

Icon

Funnel-like cap

Icon

Fibrous stem

Icon

Flaky stem surface

Icon

Adnate spore donor

Icon

Decurrent spore donor

Icon

Gills bifurcate

Coloring

The cap of Cyphella laevis is frequently colored white and yellow. The color of the flesh is often white. The gills of Cyphella laevis are regularly colored white. The spore dust is frequently colored white.

Etymology and Classification

Cyphella laevis (Gender: Feminine) was scientifically described by S. Lundell & J.A. Nannfeldt and effectively published in 1953. The name Cyphella laevis is of type combination. Cyphella laevis has the status legitimate.

The scientific classification of Cyphella laevis is Fungi, Dikarya, Basidiomycota, Agaricomycotina, Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycetidae, Agaricales, Cyphellaceae, Cyphella. For further information, please see S. Lundell et al. (1953, p. no. 2058).

Synonyms

Cyphella laevis is also known for its latin synonyms Thelephora muscigena, Stereum boreale, Leptoglossum laeve, Lachnella muscigena, Cyphellostereum laeve.

References

Lundell, S.; Nannfeldt, J.A. 1953. Fungi Exsiccati Suecici. Fasc. 41-42:2001-2100

Icon

Similar mushrooms

Mushrooms similar to Cyphella laevis

Similar mushroom thumbnail image
Bleeding broadleaf crust
Stereum rugosum

Photo: Stephen James McWilliam creative commons icon

Similar mushroom thumbnail image
Spatulate oysterling
Arrhenia spathulata

Photo: Enrico Tomschke creative commons icon

image placeholder
Pseudohelotium pineti
Similar mushroom thumbnail image
Pseudocraterellus undulatus

Photo: Dmitriy Bochkov creative commons icon

Similar mushroom thumbnail image
Moss oysterling
Arrhenia acerosa

Photo: Nina Filippova creative commons icon

image placeholder
Leptoglossum conchatum
Similar mushroom thumbnail image
Arrhenia lobata

Photo: Nina Filippova creative commons icon